Numéro C.P. : 2019-0820

Date : 2019-06-18


Whereas, on December 16, 2013, Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC (“Trans Mountain”) applied to the National Energy Board (“Board”) pursuant to Part III of the National Energy Board Act for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity in respect of the proposed construction and operation of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (“Project”);

 

Whereas, on May 19, 2016, having reviewed Trans Mountain’s application and conducted an environmental assessment of the Project, the Board submitted its report on the Project entitled Trans Mountain Expansion Project OH-001-2014 (“Board’s Report”) to the Minister of Natural Resources, pursuant to section 29 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 and section 52 of the National Energy Board Act;

 

Whereas, the initial consultation process on the Project with potentially impacted Indigenous groups was carried out in four phases: Phase I - Early Engagement (December 2013 - April 2014), Phase II – Board Hearings (April 2014 - February 2016), Phase III – Government Decision (February 2016 - November 2016), Phase IV – Regulatory Authorizations;

 

Whereas, on November 29, 2016, the Governor in Council issued Order in Council P.C. 2016-1069, which accepted the Board’s recommendation that the Project will be, if the terms and conditions set out in Appendix 3 of the Board’s Report are complied with, required by the present and future public convenience and necessity under the National Energy Board Act and will not likely cause significant adverse environmental effects under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012;

 

 

…/2

 


- 2 -

 

Whereas, on December 1, 2016, at the direction of the Governor in Council, the Board issued Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity OC-064 to Trans Mountain, in respect of the Project, making it subject to the terms and conditions set out in Appendix 3 of the Board’s Report, and issued Amending Orders AO-002-OC-49 and AO-003-OC-2;

 

Whereas, on February 2, 2018, the Governor in Council issued Order in Council P.C. 2018-58 approving the Board’s issuance of Amending Orders AO-003-OC-49 and AO-004-OC-2;

 

Whereas, on August 30, 2018, the Federal Court of Appeal (“the Court”) quashed Order in Council P.C. 2016-1069 in its decision Tsleil-Waututh Nation v. Canada (Attorney General), 2018 FCA 153 (“Tsleil-Waututh Nation Decision”) and remitted the issue of Project approval to the Governor in Council for prompt redetermination;

 

Whereas, in the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Decision, the Court concluded, among other things, that the Board ought to reconsider on a principled basis whether Project-related marine shipping is incidental to the Project, the application of section 79 of the Species at Risk Act to Project-related shipping, the Board’s environmental assessment of the Project in the light of the Project’s definition, the Board’s recommendation under subsection 29‍(1) of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 and any other matter the Governor in Council should consider appropriate;

 

Whereas, on September 20, 2018, as per the Court’s guidance, the Governor in Council issued Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177 and referred back to the Board for reconsideration the recommendations and all terms or conditions set out in the Board’s Report that are relevant to addressing the issues specified by the Court in paragraph 770 of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Decision, directed that the

 

 

 

…/3


- 3 -

 

Board conduct the reconsideration taking into account the environmental effects of Project-related marine shipping in view of the requirements of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, and the adverse effects of Project-related marine shipping on species at risk, including the Northeast Pacific Southern Resident Killer Whale population (“Southern Resident Killer Whale”), and their critical habitat, in view of any requirements of section 79 of the Species at Risk Act that may apply to the Project;

 

Whereas, on October 12, 2018, the Board decided, on a principled basis, to include Project-related marine shipping between the Westridge Marine Terminal and the 12-nautical-mile territorial sea limit in the designated Project to be assessed as defined under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012;

 

Whereas, on December 6, 2018, in Order in Council P.C. 2018-1520, pursuant to section 10 of the National Energy Board Act, Canada appointed John A. Clarkson of Sooke, British Columbia, as a Marine technical advisor to the Board to assist the Board in an advisory capacity;

 

Whereas, on February 22, 2019, having conducted its reconsideration in accordance with Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177, the Board submitted its reconsideration report on the Project entitled National Energy Board Reconsideration Report - Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - MH-052-2018 (“the Board’s Reconsideration Report”) and submitted it to the Minister of Natural Resources, pursuant to section 30 of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 and section 53 of the National Energy Board Act;

 

Whereas, pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, the Board was of the view that the Project is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects, specifically that Project-related marine shipping is likely to cause significant adverse

 

 

…/4


- 4 -

 

environmental effects on the Southern Resident Killer Whale, and on Indigenous cultural use associated with the Southern Resident Killer Whale, despite the fact that effects from Project-related marine shipping will be a small fraction of the total cumulative effects, and that the level of marine traffic is expected to increase regardless of whether the Project is approved, that greenhouse gas (or GHG) emissions from Project-related marine vessels would result in measureable increases and, taking a precautionary approach, are likely to be significant and that while a credible worst-case spill from the Project or a Project-related vessel is not likely, if it were to occur, the environmental effects would be significant;

 

Whereas, while these effects weighed heavily in the Board’s reconsideration of Project-related marine shipping, it concluded that, in light of the considerable benefits of the Project and measures to mitigate the effects, and the Recommendations to the Governor in Council proposed by the Board, these effects can be justified in the circumstances;

 

Whereas, the Board concluded that the Project is and will be required by the present and future public convenience and necessity, and is in the Canadian public interest and recommended that a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity be issued for the Project under section 52 of the National Energy Board Act, subject to the 156 conditions outlined in the Board’s Reconsideration Report;

 

Whereas, the Board’s MH-052-2018 hearing also forms part of the overall consultation process with Indigenous peoples with respect to their constitutionally protected rights and the Board has considered those aspects of consultation which are relevant to the Reconsideration and for which evidence was filed on the record;

 

Whereas, pursuant to the National Energy Board Act, the Board confirmed the recommendation, and replaced certain conditions that it provided to the Governor in Council in its OH-001-2014 Report, and recommended that the Governor in Council approve the Project by directing the issuance of a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to Trans Mountain, subject to 156 conditions;

…/5


- 5 -

 

Whereas, in its Reconsideration Report, the Board made 16 recommendations (the “Recommendations”) to the Governor in Council associated with Project-related marine shipping which it determined were outside of the control of Trans Mountain and the Board’s authority to regulate but for which it determined the Governor in Council was not so limited, including cumulative effects management for the Salish Sea, measures to offset increased underwater noise and increased strike risk posed to the Species at Risk Act-listed marine mammal and fish species, including the Southern Resident Killer Whale, marine oil spill response, marine shipping and small vessel safety, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from marine vessels, and engagement on the marine safety system with the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee;

 

Whereas, the Board has identified the adverse effects of the Project and its related marine shipping on Species at Risk Act-listed wildlife species and their critical habitat, consistent with any applicable recovery strategy and action plans, including the Southern Resident Killer Whale and its critical habitat and has imposed conditions and has recommended to the Governor in Council measures which are among the Recommendations to avoid or lessen those effects and to monitor them;

 

Whereas, in the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Decision the Court concluded among other things that the Government failed to engage in meaningful dialogue and grapple with concerns expressed to it in good faith by Indigenous groups, that the Government did not fulfill its duty to consult with and, if appropriate accommodate Indigenous peoples and as a result Canada must re-do Phase III consultations;

 

Whereas, on September 28, 2018, Canada wrote to Indigenous groups potentially impacted by the Project, encouraging them to participate in the Board process and clarified that it intends to rely on the Board reconsideration process, to the extent possible, to fulfill the legal duty to consult related to Project-related marine shipping;

 

 

 

…/6


- 6 -

 

Whereas, on October 5, 2018, the Government re-initiated Phase III consultations, in keeping with the Court’s decision and direction, and guided by the objectives of meeting its consultation obligations under section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, and its commitments to advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, engaged in substantive, meaningful two-way dialogue in order to fully understand the concerns raised and the nature and seriousness of potential impacts on rights and, where appropriate, to work collaboratively with Indigenous groups to identify and provide accommodations, and respond to concerns raised in these and the previous Phase III consultations in a flexible manner that takes into account the potential impacts and needs of each Indigenous group;

 

Whereas, responding to concerns outlined by the Court, Canada appointed the Honourable Frank Iacobucci, former Supreme Court of Canada Justice, as a Federal Representative, to provide oversight and direction to the Government on how to conduct meaningful consultations and accommodations and ensure that the consultation process proceeded as the Court prescribed;

 

Whereas, responding to concerns outlined by the Court, Canada established a system to communicate and seek direction from senior management and decision makers, including Ministers, on the issues being raised at the consultations, provided regular consultations updates by the Minister of Natural Resources to other Ministers of the Crown, held periodical Ministerial meetings with consultations leads to discuss the consultation process and specific accommodations measures and held 46 ministerial meetings with over 65 Indigenous groups potentially impacted by the Project;

 

Whereas, during the re-initiated Phase III consultations (2018-2019) the Government presented a number of specific, targeted accommodations measures designed to respond to concerns raised by Indigenous groups, including but not limited to the Co-Developing Community Response, the Salish Sea Initiative, the Terrestrial Cumulative Effects Initiative and the Quiet Vessel Initiative;

…/7


- 7 -

 

Whereas, Canada is relying on the Board’s OH-001-2014 and MH-052-2018 hearings to fulfill the duty to consult, to the extent possible;

 

Whereas, in the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Decision the Court noted that when considering whether Canada has fulfilled its duty to consult, the Governor in Council necessarily has the power to impose conditions on any certificate of public convenience and necessity it directs the Board to issue, and that the Governor in Council has the power pursuant to section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 to add or amend conditions in order to address impacts to section 35 Aboriginal or treaty rights;

 

Whereas, in response to submissions from the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee and proposals from Indigenous groups during re-initiated consultations and seeking to accommodate outstanding Indigenous concerns raised during consultations the Governor in Council has amended certain Project certificate conditions as proposed in appendix 3 of the Board’s Reconsideration Report Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - MH-052-2018, as indicated in the annexed form;

 

Whereas Canada is not prepared to waive any immunities to which it is entitled as owner of the pipeline;

 

Whereas Condition 2 to the Project certificate requires Trans Mountain to work with municipalities and, as a good neighbour, seek to obtain appropriate provincial and municipal permits and authorizations;

 

Whereas, on April 17, 2019, the Governor in Council issued Order in Council P.C. 2019-378 pursuant to subsection 54‍(3) of the National Energy Board Act, extending the time limit for making the order referred to in subsection 54‍(1) of that Act to June 18, 2019, in respect of the Project, in order to ensure adequate time to conclude consultations with Indigenous peoples prior to a Governor in Council decision on the Project;

…/8


- 8 -

 

Whereas the Governor in Council, having considered Indigenous concerns and interests of 129 groups as set out in the Trans Mountain Expansion Project - Crown Consultation and Accommodation Report dated June 13, 2019, and having considered Justice Iacobucci’s oversight, direction and advice, is satisfied that: the consultation process undertaken is consistent with the honour of the Crown and meets the guidance set forth in the Tsleil-Waututh Nation Decision for meaningful two-way dialogue focused on rights and the potential impacts on rights, and that the concerns, and potential impacts to interests including established and asserted Aboriginal and treaty rights identified in the consultation process have been appropriately accommodated;

 

Whereas the Governor in Council accepts the Board’s views that the Project is required by the present and future public convenience and necessity and is in the Canadian public interest, and considering the Board’s views that the significant adverse environmental effects it is likely to cause can be justified in the circumstances under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, the Board recommends that the Governor in Council approve the Project by directing the issuance of a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to Trans Mountain, subject to the terms and conditions set out in Appendix 3 of the Board’s Reconsideration Report;

 

Whereas, the Governor in Council, having reviewed the Recommendations of the Board to the Governor in Council contained in the Reconsideration Report, undertakes to implement all the Recommendations;

 

Whereas, the Governor in Council, having considered the Board’s Reconsideration Report, the terms and conditions for Trans Mountain and the Recommendations to the Governor in Council, measures being taken by Canada with respect to Species at Risk Act-listed species including the Southern Resident Killer Whale and

 

 

…/9


- 9 -

 

including measures related to the reduction of underwater noise and vessel strikes such as the Oceans Protection Plan, the Whales Initiative, and the measures set out in Order in Council P.C. 2018-1352 dated November 1, 2018 and the measures announced in May 2019, the concerns of Indigenous groups including potential impacts to Indigenous interests, including established and asserted Aboriginal and treaty rights, in relation to the Southern Resident Killer Whale and measures being taken by Canada to address those concerns and potential impacts, and Canada’s commitment to assess, monitor and report on the effectiveness of these measures and adaptively manage them, is satisfied that measures have been and are being taken to mitigate the significant adverse environmental effects on the Southern Resident Killer Whale and Indigenous cultural use of the Southern Resident Killer Whale and to avoid or lessen the adverse effects of Project-related marine shipping on listed species at risk and their critical habitat, including the Southern Resident Killer Whale and their critical habitat, and that those measures will be assessed, monitored and adaptively managed;

 

Whereas the Governor in Council, having considered the estimated upstream greenhouse gas emissions associated with the Project and identified in Environment and Climate Change Canada’s report entitled Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC — Trans Mountain Expansion Project: Review of Related Upstream Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimates, and measures under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, is satisfied that the Project is consistent with Canada’s commitments in relation to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change;

 

And whereas the Governor in Council considers that the Project would increase access to diverse markets for Canadian oil and support economic development while ensuring safety and environmental protection;

 

 

 

 

…/10


- 10 -

 

Therefore, Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Natural Resources,

 

(a) pursuant to subsection 31‍(1) of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, decides that, taking into account the terms and conditions referred to in paragraph (b), the Trans Mountain Expansion Project is likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects that can be justified in the circumstances, and directs the National Energy Board to issue a decision statement concerning that Project;

 

(b) pursuant to subsection 54‍(1) of the National Energy Board Act, directs the National Energy Board to issue Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity OC-65 to Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC, in respect of the proposed construction and operation of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, subject to the terms and conditions set out in Appendix 3 of the National Energy Board Report of February 22, 2019 entitled National Energy Board Reconsideration Report - Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - MH-052-2018 with conditions 6, 91, 98, 100, 124 and 151 superseded by the conditions as amended in the annexed form; and

 

(c) pursuant to subsection 21‍(2) of the National Energy Board Act,

 

(i) approves the issuance by the National Energy Board to Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC of Amending Orders AO-004-OC-49 and AO-005-OC-2, substantially in the annexed form, and

 

(ii) approves the December 1, 2016 issuance by the National Energy Board to Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC of Amending Orders AO-002-OC-49 and, AO-003-OC-2.

 

 


Attendu que, le 16 décembre 2013, Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC (Trans Mountain) a présenté à l’Office national de l’énergie (Office), sous le régime de la partie III de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, une demande visant l’obtention d’un certificat d’utilité publique concernant la construction et l’exploitation projetées quant au projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain (projet);

 

Attendu que, le 19 mai 2016, après avoir examiné la demande de Trans Mountain et effectué l’évaluation environnementale du projet, l’Office a présenté au ministre des Ressources naturelles son rapport sur le projet intitulé Projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain OH-001-2014 (rapport de l’Office), conformément à l’article 29 de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012) et à l’article 52 de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie;

 

Attendu que le processus de consultation initial avec les groupes autochtones potentiellement touchés au sujet du projet a été mis en œuvre en quatre étapes : Étape I, les consultations initiales (décembre 2013 à avril 2014); Étape II, les audiences de l’Office (avril 2014 à février 2016); Étape III, la décision du gouvernement (février 2016 à novembre 2016); Étape IV, les autorisations réglementaires;

 

Attendu que, par le décret C.P. 2016-1069 du 29 novembre 2016, la gouverneure en conseil a accepté la recommandation de l’Office selon laquelle, si les conditions énoncées à l’annexe 3 du rapport de l’Office sont respectées, le projet présentera, aux termes de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, un caractère d’utilité publique, tant pour le présent que pour le futur, et que le projet n’est pas susceptible d’entraîner des effets environnementaux négatifs et importants pour l’application de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012);

…/2

 


- 2 -

 

Attendu que, le 1er décembre 2016, sur instruction de la gouverneure en conseil, l’Office a délivré à Trans Mountain le certificat d’utilité publique OC-064, relativement au projet, assortissant celui-ci des conditions énoncées à l’annexe 3 du rapport de l’Office, et a rendu les ordonnances modificatrices AO-002-OC-49 et AO-003-OC-2;

 

Attendu que, par le décret C.P. 2018-58 du 2 février 2018, la gouverneure en conseil a agréé la délivrance par l’Office à Trans Mountain des ordonnances modificatrices AO-003-OC-49 et AO-004-OC-2;

 

Attendu que, le 30 août 2018, la Cour d’appel fédérale (Cour) a annulé le décret C.P. 2016-1069 dans la décision qu’elle a rendue dans l’affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation c. Canada (Procureur général), 2018 CAF 153 (affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation) et a renvoyé la question de l’approbation du projet à la gouverneure en conseil pour qu’elle prenne rapidement une nouvelle décision;

 

Attendu que, dans l’affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation, la Cour a notamment conclu que l’Office devait réexaminer, à la lumière des principes, les questions suivantes, à savoir si le transport maritime associé au projet est accessoire au projet, l’application de l’article 79 de la Loi sur les espèces en péril au transport maritime associé au projet, l’évaluation environnementale du projet par l’Office à la lumière de la définition du projet, la recommandation faite par l’Office sous le régime du paragraphe 29(1) de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012) et toute autre question que la gouverneure en conseil estime indiquée;

 

Attendu que, conformément à l’orientation de la Cour, la gouverneure en conseil a délivré le décret C.P. 2018-1177 du 20 septembre 2018, qui renvoie à l’Office, pour réexamen, les recommandations et les conditions contenues dans le rapport de l’Office qui sont pertinentes dans le cadre de l’examen des questions

 

 

…/3


- 3 -

 

énoncées par la Cour d’appel fédérale au paragraphe 770 de la décision dans l’affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation et a donné instruction à l’Office de tenir compte des effets environnementaux du transport maritime associé au projet, selon les exigences de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012), des effets nocifs du transport maritime associé au projet sur les espèces en péril, y compris la population des épaulards résidents du sud du Pacifique Nord-Est (épaulards résidents du sud), et leur habitat essentiel, selon les exigences de l’article 79 de la Loi sur les espèces en péril pouvant s’appliquer au projet;

 

Attendu que, le 12 octobre 2018, l’Office a décidé, en fonction des principes établis, d’inclure le transport maritime associé au projet entre le terminal maritime de Westridge et la limite de 12 miles marins de la mer territoriale dans le projet désigné dans l’évaluation au sens de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012);

 

Attendu que, par le décret C.P. 2018-1520 du 6 décembre 2018 et en vertu de l’article 10 de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, le Canada a nommé John A. Clarkson, de Sooke (Colombie-Britannique), conseiller technique maritime auprès de l’Office pour aider l’Office à titre de conseiller;

 

Attendu que, le 22 février 2019, ayant tenu son réexamen conformément au décret C.P. 2018-1177, l’Office a diffusé son rapport de réexamen du projet intitulé Office national de l’énergie – rapport de réexamen – Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC – MH-052-2018 (rapport de réexamen), et l’a présenté au ministre des Ressources naturelles, conformément à l’article 30 de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012) et à l’article 53 de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie;

 

 

 

 

 

 

…/4


- 4 -

 

Attendu que, conformément à la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012), l’Office était d’avis que le projet est susceptible d’entraîner des effets environnementaux négatifs et importants, plus précisément que les activités de transport maritime connexe au projet seraient susceptibles d’avoir des effets environnementaux négatifs et importants sur les épaulards résidents du sud et sur les usages culturels autochtones en rapport avec les épaulards résidents du sud, même si les effets résultant du transport maritime connexe au projet ne représenteraient qu’une petite fraction des effets cumulatifs totaux et même si une intensification du trafic maritime est prévisible, que le projet soit approuvé ou non, que les émissions des gaz à effet de serre (GES) des vaisseaux marins associés au projet donneraient lieu à des augmentations mesurables et, si l’on adopte une approche de précaution, sont susceptibles d’être importantes et que bien qu’un scénario plausible d’un pire cas de déversement, en raison du projet ou d’un navire associé au projet, soit peu probable, si cela devait survenir, les effets sur l’environnement seraient importants;

 

Attendu que, même si ces effets ont pesé lourd dans le réexamen par l’Office des activités de transport maritime associé au projet, l’Office a conclu qu’à la lumière des avantages considérables du projet et des mesures d’atténuation des effets, et des Recommandations à la gouverneure en conseil fournis par l’Office, ces effets sont justifiables dans les circonstances;

 

Attendu que l’Office a conclu que le projet a un caractère d’utilité publique, tant pour le présent que pour le futur, et qu’il est dans l’intérêt public des Canadiens et a recommandé qu’un certificat d’utilité publique soit délivré dans le cadre du projet en vertu de l’article 52 de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, assorti de 156 conditions énumérées dans le rapport de réexamen de l’Office;

 

 

 

 

 

…/5


- 5 -

 

Attendu que l’audience MH-052-2018 de l’Office fait également partie du processus global de consultation avec les peuples autochtones en ce qui concerne leurs droits protégés par la Constitution et que l’Office a examiné ces aspects de la consultation qui sont pertinents au réexamen et pour lesquels des éléments de preuve ont été déposés au dossier;

 

Attendu que, conformément à la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, l’Office a confirmé la recommandation, et a remplacé certaines conditions, qu’il a fourni à la gouverneure en conseil dans son Rapport OH-001-2014 et a recommandé que la gouverneure en conseil approuve le projet en donnant à l’Office instruction de délivrer un certificat d’utilité publique à l’égard de Trans Mountain, assorti de 156 conditions;

 

Attendu que, dans son rapport de réexamen, l’Office a fait 16 recommandations (Recommandations) à la gouverneure en conseil associées au transport maritime lié au projet, dont elle a déterminé qu’elles étaient hors du contrôle de la Trans Mountain et du pouvoir de réglementation de l’Office, mais pour lesquelles il a déterminé que la gouverneure en conseil n’était pas limitée de telle manière, notamment sur la gestion des effets cumulatifs de la mer des Salish, des mesures pour compenser l’augmentation du bruit sous-marin et l’augmentation du risque de collision posé aux espèces de poissons et de mammifères marins énumérés à la Loi sur les espèces en péril, y compris les épaulards résidents du sud, l’intervention en cas de déversement d’hydrocarbures en milieu marin, le transport maritime et la sécurité des petits navires, la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre provenant de navires et la participation avec le Comité consultatif et de surveillance autochtone au système de sécurité maritime;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…/6


- 6 -

 

Attendu que, l’Office a déterminé les effets négatifs du projet et des activités de transport maritime connexes sur les espèces sauvages inscrites à la Loi sur les espèces en péril et leur habitat essentiel, conformément à toute stratégie de rétablissement et à tous les plans d’action, y compris les épaulards résidents du sud et leur habitat essentiel et a imposé des conditions et recommandé à la gouverneure en conseil l’adoption de mesures se trouvant parmi les Recommandations pour éviter ou atténuer ces effets et les surveiller;

 

Attendu que, dans l’affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation, la Cour a notamment conclu que le gouvernement ne s’est pas livré à un dialogue significatif, et ne s’est pas penché sur les préoccupations qui lui ont été exprimées de bonne foi par les groupes autochtones, que le gouvernement ne s’est pas acquitté de son obligation de consulter et d’accommoder les peuples autochtones, si c’est approprié. Par conséquent, le gouvernement du Canada doit recommencer les consultations de l’Étape III;

 

Attendu que, le 28 septembre 2018, le Canada a écrit aux groupes autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, pour les encourager à participer au processus de l’Office et a précisé qu’elle avait l’intention de s’appuyer sur le processus de réexamen de l’Office, dans la mesure du possible, pour s’acquitter de son obligation juridique de consulter en ce qui concerne le transport maritime associé au projet;

 

Attendu que, le 5 octobre 2018, le gouvernement a relancé les consultations de l’Étape III, conformément à la décision et à l’orientation de la Cour et, orienté par ses objectifs de respecter ses obligations de consultation en vertu de l’article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982 et par ses engagements de faire avancer la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones, il s’est engagé à participer à un véritable dialogue bidirectionnel efficace afin de comprendre entièrement les préoccupations soulevées et la nature et la gravité des effets possibles sur les droits et, le cas échéant, à travailler en

 

 

…/7


- 7 -

 

collaboration avec les groupes autochtones pour cerner et fournir des accommodements et à répondre aux préoccupations soulevées au cours de ces consultations et lors des consultations précédentes de l’Étape III, d’une manière flexible qui tient compte des effets potentiels et des besoins de chaque groupe autochtone;

 

Attendu que, suite aux préoccupations énoncées par la Cour, le Canada a nommé l’honorable Frank Iacobucci, ancien juge de la Cour suprême du Canada, en tant que représentant du gouvernement fédéral, afin de surveiller et de guider le gouvernement sur la façon de mener des consultations sérieuses et des accommodements et de s’assurer que le processus de consultation a procédé tel que prescrit par la Cour;

 

Attendu que, en réponse à des préoccupations énoncées par la Cour, le Canada a établi un système pour communiquer et pour demander des directives de la haute direction et des décideurs, y compris les ministres, sur les questions soulevées lors des consultations, a fourni des mises à jour régulières sur les consultations par le ministre des Ressources naturelles aux autres ministres de la Couronne, a tenu des réunions ministérielles périodiques avec les dirigeants des consultations pour discuter du processus de consultation et des mesures d’adaptation précises et a tenu 46 réunions ministérielles avec plus de 65 groupes autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet;

 

Attendu que, au cours des consultations relancées de l’Étape III (2018-2019), le gouvernement a présenté un certain nombre de mesures d’accommodement précises ciblées conçues pour répondre aux préoccupations soulevées par les groupes autochtones, notamment, l’élaboration conjointe de la réponse communautaire, l’Initiative de la mer des Salish, l’initiative d’évaluation des effets terrestres cumulatifs et l’Initiative de réduction du bruit des navires;

 

Attendu que le Canada s’appuie sur les audiences OH-001-2014 et MH-052-2018 de l’Office pour respecter, dans la mesure du possible, son obligation de consultation;

…/8


- 8 -

 

Attendu que, dans l’affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation, la Cour a fait remarquer qu’au moment d’examiner la question de savoir si le Canada s’est acquitté de son obligation de consultation, la gouverneure en conseil a nécessairement le pouvoir d’imposer des conditions pour tout certificat d’utilité publique qu’elle ordonne à l’Office de délivrer, et que la gouverneure en conseil a le pouvoir, conformément à l’article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982 d’ajouter ou de modifier les conditions afin de régler les répercussions sur les droits ancestraux ou issus de traités, prévus à l’article 35;

 

Attendu que, en réponse aux représentations du Comité consultatif et de surveillance autochtone et aux propositions des groupes autochtones au cours des consultations de l’Étape III et dans le cadre des tentatives d’accommoder les préoccupations autochtones qui subsistent, soulevées au cours des consultations, la gouverneure en conseil a modifié certaines conditions du certificat du projet telles que proposées à l’annexe 3 du rapport de réexamen de l’Office intitulé Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC – MH 052-2018, comme indiqué dans l’annexe ci-joint;

 

Attendu que le Canada n’est pas disposé à renoncer à toute immunité à laquelle elle a droit à titre de propriétaire du pipeline;

 

Attendu que la condition 2 assortie au certificat délivré pour le projet exige de Trans Mountain qu’il travaille avec les municipalités et, en bon voisin, chercher à obtenir les permis et autorisations provinciales et municipales;

 

Attendu que, par le décret C.P. 2019-378 du 17 avril 2019, la gouverneure en conseil, en vertu du paragraphe 54‍(3) de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, a prorogé le délai visé à ce paragraphe pour prendre le décret visé au paragraphe 54‍(1) de cette Loi au 18 juin 2019, relativement au Projet, afin d’accorder du temps suffisant pour terminer les consultations auprès des peuples autochtones avant une décision de la gouverneure en conseil sur le Projet;

 

 

…/9


- 9 -

 

Attendu que la gouverneure en conseil est convaincue, après examen des préoccupations et des intérêts des 129 groupes autochtones cernés dans le Projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain - Rapport sur les consultations et les accommodements de la couronne daté du 13 juin 2019, et après avoir pris en considération la surveillance par le juge Iacobucci, son orientation et son avis que le processus de consultation est compatible avec l’honneur de la Couronne et répond aux directives énoncées dans l’affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation pour un dialogue bidirectionnel axé sur les droits et les impacts potentiels sur les droits et, que les préoccupations, et les impacts potentiels sur les intérêts, y compris les droits ancestraux et issus de traités établis et revendiqués, cernés lors du processus de consultation, ont fait l’objet de mesures d’accommodement appropriées;

 

Attendu que la gouverneure en conseil accepte l’avis de l’Office selon laquelle le Projet a un caractère d’utilité publique, tant pour le présent que pour le futur, et qu’il est dans l’intérêt public des Canadiens et, compte tenu de l’avis de l’Office, que les effets environnementaux négatifs et importants qu’il est susceptible d’entraîner sont justifiables dans les circonstances en vertu de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012), l’Office recommande que la gouverneure en conseil approuve le Projet en ordonnant la délivrance d’un certificat d’utilité publique à Trans Mountain, assortissant celui-ci des conditions énoncées à l’annexe 3 du rapport de réexamen de l’Office;

 

Attendu que la gouverneure en conseil, ayant examiné les Recommandations de l’Office à la gouverneure en conseil contenus dans le rapport de réexamen, s’engage à mettre en œuvre les Recommandations;

 

Attendu que la gouverneure en conseil, après avoir pris en compte le rapport de réexamen de l’Office, les conditions assorties au certificat délivré à Trans Mountain et les Recommandations dans le rapport de réexamen de l’Office à la gouverneure en conseil, les mesures prises par le Canada concernant les espèces inscrites à

 

…/10


- 10 -

 

la Loi sur les espèces en péril, y compris les épaulards résidents du sud et les mesures visant à réduire le bruit sous-marin et la collision de navire, tel que les mesures prises en vertu du Plan de protection des océans, de l’Initiative de protection des baleines, et les mesures mentionnées au décret C.P. 2018-1352 du 1er novembre 2018 et celles annoncées en mai 2019, les préoccupations des groupes autochtones, y compris les répercussions potentielles sur les intérêts des groupes autochtones, y compris les droits ancestraux ou issus de traités, établis et revendiqués, en ce qui concerne l’épaulard résident du sud et les mesures prises par le Canada pour répondre à ces préoccupations et répercussions potentielles, de même que l’engagement du Canada à évaluer, surveiller et à signaler l’efficacité de ces mesures et à les gérer de manière adaptative, est convaincue que des mesures ont été prises et sont prises pour atténuer les effets environnementaux négatifs et importants sur les épaulards résidents du sud et sur les usages culturels autochtones en rapport avec les épaulards résidents du sud et pour éviter ou atténuer les effets néfastes du transport maritime sur les espèces en péril et sur leur habitat essentiel, y compris les épaulards résidents du sud et leur habitat essentiel, et que ces mesures seront évalués, surveillés et gérés de manière adaptative;

 

Attendu que la gouverneure en conseil, après avoir pris en compte les estimations d’émissions de gaz à effet de serre en amont associées au projet figurant dans le rapport d’Environnement Canada intitulé Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC – Projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain : Examen des estimations de gaz à effet de serre en amont associées au projet et les mesures associées comprises dans le plan intitulé Cadre pancanadien sur la croissance propre et les changements climatiques, est convaincue que le projet est compatible avec les engagements pris par le Canada dans le cadre de l’Accord de Paris sur le climat;

 

Attendu que la gouverneure en conseil estime que le projet permettrait d’accroître l’accès du pétrole canadien aux marchés, et de soutenir le développement économique tout en assurant la sécurité et la protection de l’environnement,

…/11


- 11 -

 

À ces causes, sur recommandation du ministre des Ressources naturelles, Son Excellence la Gouverneure générale en conseil :

 

a) en vertu du paragraphe 31‍(1) de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012), décide que, compte tenu des conditions visées à l’alinéa b), la réalisation du projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain aura probablement des effets environnementaux négatifs et importants qui sont justifiables dans les circonstances, et donne instruction à l’Office national de l’énergie de faire une déclaration à l’égard de ce projet;

 

b) en vertu du paragraphe 54‍(1) de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie, donne à l’Office national de l’énergie instruction de délivrer à Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC le certificat d’utilité publique OC-65 à l’égard de la construction et de l’exploitation projetées quant au projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, selon les conditions visées à l’annexe 3 du rapport de l’Office national de l’énergie, du 22 février 2019, intitulé Office national de l’énergie – rapport de réexamen de l’Office — Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC – MH-052-2018 et les conditions 6, 91, 98, 100, 124 et 151 remplacées par les conditions modifiées énoncées à l’annexe ci-jointe;

 

c) en vertu du paragraphe 21‍(2) de la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie:

 

(i) agrée la délivrance par l’Office national de l’énergie à Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC des ordonnances modificatrices AO-004-OC-49 et AO-005-OC-2, conformes en substance au texte ci-après,

 

(ii) agrée la délivrance du 1er décembre 2016 par l’Office national de l’énergie à Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC des ordonnances modificatrices AO-002-OC-49 et AO-003-OC-2.

 

 


ANNEX

 

Amendments to National Energy Board Conditions

 

Note: Amendments to National Energy Board conditions are italicized and underlined.

 

Condition 6: Commitments tracking table

 

Without limiting Conditions 2, 3 and 4, Trans Mountain must implement the commitments contained within its commitments tracking table. The proponent shall periodically update the commitments tracking table as per b), by adding to the table all commitments made by the Proponent in respect of the Project subsequent to the close of the MH-052-2018 proceeding, and must:

 

a) file with the NEB and post on its website, at least thirty (30) days prior to commencing construction, an updated commitments tracking table. The commitments tracking table must contain:

 

i) all commitments Trans Mountain made to Indigenous groups in its Project application or to which it otherwise committed on the record of the OH-001-2014 proceeding, as well as the MH-052-2018 proceeding, during phase III and IV consultations, and during ongoing consultations and engagements;

 

ii) a plan for addressing all commitments made to Indigenous groups, the plan must include:

 

1) a description of the approach for addressing each commitment made to Indigenous groups

 

2) the accountable lead for implementing each commitment; and,

 

3) the estimated timeline associated with the fulfillment of each commitment; and

 

4) the criteria used to determine when commitments have been fulfilled/satisfied.

 

b) file with the NEB, at the following times, an updated commitments tracking table, including the status of each commitment:

 


 

i) within 3 months after the [certificate/order] date;

 

ii) at least 30 days prior to commencing construction;

 

iii) monthly, from the commencement of construction until the first month after commencing operations; and

 

iv) quarterly thereafter until:

 

1) all commitments on the table are satisfied (superseded, complete or otherwise closed), at which time Trans Mountain must file confirmation, signed by an officer of the company, that the commitments on the table have been satisfied; or

 

2) 6 years after commencing operations, at which time Trans Mountain must file with the NEB a summary of any outstanding commitments and a plan and implementation timeline for addressing these commitments; whichever comes earlier;

 

c) post on its company website the same information required by a) and b), using the same indicated timeframes; and

 

d) maintain at each of its construction offices:

 

i) the relevant environmental portion of the commitments tracking table listing all of Trans Mountain’s regulatory commitments, including those from the Project application and subsequent filings, and environmental conditions or site-specific mitigation or monitoring measures from permits, authorizations, and approvals for the Project issued by federal, provincial, or other permitting authorities;

 

ii) copies of any permits, authorizations, and approvals referenced in i); and

 

iii) copies of any subsequent variances to permits, authorizations, and approvals referenced in i).

 


 

Condition 91: Plan for marine spill prevention and response commitments

 

Trans Mountain must file with the NEB, within 6 months from the issuance date of the Certificate, a plan describing how it will ensure that it will meet the requirements of Condition 133 regarding marine spill prevention and response. The plan must be prepared in consultation with Transport Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, the Pacific Pilotage Authority, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, British Columbia Coast Pilots, Western Canada Marine Response Corporation, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Province of British Columbia, and potentially affected Indigenous groups, and must identify any issues or concerns raised and how Trans Mountain has addressed or responded to them.

Trans Mountain must provide a summary of its consultations for this purpose, including a description and rationale for how Trans Mountain has incorporated the results of its consultation into the strategy.

 

Trans Mountain must provide the plan to the above-mentioned parties at the same time as it is filed with the NEB. 

 

Condition 98: Plan for Indigenous group participation in construction monitoring

 

Trans Mountain must file with the NEB, at least 2 months prior to commencing construction, a plan describing participation by Indigenous groups in monitoring activities during construction for the protection of traditional land and resource use for the pipelines, terminals and pump stations, and traditional marine resource use at the Westridge Marine Terminal. The plan must include:

 

a) a summary of engagement activities undertaken with Indigenous groups to determine opportunities for their participation in monitoring activities;

b) a description and justification for how Trans Mountain has incorporated the results of its engagements, including any recommendations, into the plan;

c) a list of potentially affected Indigenous groups, if any, that have reached agreement with Trans Mountain to participate in monitoring activities;

d) the scope, methodology, and rationale for monitoring activities to be undertaken by Trans Mountain and each participating Indigenous group identified in b), including those elements of construction and geographic locations that will involve Indigenous Monitors;

e) a description of how Trans Mountain will use the information gathered through the participation of Indigenous Monitors; and


 

f) a description of how Trans Mountain will provide the information gathered through the participation of Indigenous Monitors to potentially affected Indigenous groups, subject to appropriate protections for confidential information.

 

Trans Mountain must provide a copy of the report to each all potentially affected groups identified in b) above at the same time that it is filed with the NEB.

 

Condition 100: Heritage Resources and Sacred and Cultural Sites

 

Trans Mountain must file with the NEB at least thirty days prior to commencing construction of individual Project components as described in Condition 10(a):

 

a) confirmation, signed by an officer of the company, that it has obtained all of the required archaeological and heritage resource permits and clearances from the Alberta Department of Culture and the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations;

 

b) confirmation that it has consulted with the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, and that the Ministry has reviewed and approved the mitigation measures for disturbance to impacted palaeontological sites within British Columbia;

 

c) a description of how Trans Mountain will meet any conditions and respond to any comments and recommendations contained in the permits and clearances referred to in a) or obtained through the consultation referred to in b);

 

d) a list of sacred and cultural sites identified in the OH-001-2014 proceeding, MH-05-2018 Reconsideration proceeding, or Phase III Crown consultations and not already captured under condition 97;

 

e) a summary of any mitigation measures that Trans Mountain will implement to reduce or eliminate, to the extent possible, Project effects on sites listed in d), or a rationale for why mitigation was not required;

 

f) confirmation that Trans Mountain will update the relevant Environmental Projection Plan(s), to include any relevant information from the conditions or recommendations referred to in c) or the mitigations referred to in e). 

 


 

Condition 124: Implementing improvements to Trans Mountain’s Emergency Management Program

 

Trans Mountain must file with the NEB, at least 6 months prior to commencing operations, a detailed summary of its review of its Emergency Response Plans (as noted in Conditions 125 and 126) and equipment (including its availability), as referenced in Volume 7, Section 4.8.2 of its Project application (Filing A3S4V5). This filing must include a description of changes made to Trans Mountain’s Emergency Management Program, as required under the National Energy Board Onshore Pipeline Regulations, including changes to:

a) the Pipeline Emergency Response Plan;

 

b) Emergency Response Plans for the Edmonton, Sumas, and Burnaby Terminals, as well as the Westridge Marine Terminal; and

 

c) site-specific plans and documents related to a) and b), such as Geographic Response Plans, Geographical Response Strategies, control point mapping, tactical plans for submerged and sunken oil and tactical plans for high consequence areas.

 

The summary must demonstrate Trans Mountain’s ability to prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the potential effects of emergencies of any type and in any geographic region or season and must include the following:

 

i)  a discussion of how the updated plans conform to the requirements contained within the National Energy Board Onshore Pipeline Regulations;

 

ii)  a discussion of how the plans consider, and would allow coordination with relevant federal, provincial, municipal and Indigenous community emergency response plans;

 

iii)  a discussion of how the results of research initiatives, such as the Scientific Advisory Committee work noted in Trans Mountain’s response to NEB Information Request No. 1.63 (Filing A3W9H8) and other research noted during the OH-001-2014 proceeding, have been considered and incorporated into Trans Mountain’s emergency response planning;

 

iv)  a description of the models used in response planning, including oil trajectory, fate and behavior, and air dispersion models; and

 


 

v)  confirmation that an independent third party has reviewed and assessed the Emergency Response Plans and that Trans Mountain has considered and incorporated the comments generated by the review and assessment into the plans.

 

vi)  a summary of its consultations with Appropriate Government Authorities, first responders, potentially affected Indigenous groups, and affected landowners/tenants (Condition 90 and Condition 117). In its summary, Trans Mountain must provide a description and justification for how Trans Mountain has incorporated the results of its consultation including any recommendations from those consulted into Trans Mountain’s Emergency Management Program, including its Emergency Response Plans.

 

Condition 151: Post-construction environmental monitoring reports

 

Trans Mountain must file with the NEB, on or before 31 January following the first, third, and fifth complete growing seasons after completing final clean-up, a post-construction environmental monitoring report for the Project that must include:

 

a) a description of the valued components or issues that were assessed or monitored;

 

b) measurable goals for each valued component or issue;

 

c) monitoring methods for each valued component or issue, results of the monitoring, and a comparison to the defined measurable goals;

 

d) corrective actions taken, their observed success, and their current status;

 

e) identification on a map or diagram of the locations where corrective actions were taken;

 

f) any further corrective actions planned and a schedule for monitoring and reporting;

 

g) a summary of its consultations with appropriate government authorities and any potentially affected Indigenous groups and affected landowners/tenants;

 

h) In its summary, Trans Mountain must provide a description and justification for how Trans Mountain has incorporated the results of its consultation into the strategy.

In the post-construction environmental monitoring report filed after the fifth full growing season after completing clean-up, Trans Mountain must include:

 


 

i.  an assessment of the effectiveness of mitigative and corrective actions and how learnings have been or will be applied to Trans Mountain’s Environmental Protection Program;

 

ii.  a detailed description of all valued components or issues for which the measurable goals have not been achieved during the duration of the post-construction monitoring program; and

 

iii.  an evaluation of the need for any further corrective actions, measurable goals, assessments, or monitoring of valued components or issues, including a schedule for those.

 

All filed post-construction environmental monitoring reports must address issues related, but not limited, to: soils; weeds; watercourse crossings; riparian vegetation; wetlands; rare plants, lichens and ecological communities; municipal tree replacement; wildlife and wildlife habitat; fish and fish habitat; marine fish and fish habitat; marine mammals; marine birds; and species at risk.

 

 


 

ANNEXE

 

Amendements aux conditions de l’Office national de l’énergie

 

Note: Les amendements aux conditions de l’Office national de l’énergie sont en italiques et soulignés.  

 

Condition 6 : Tableau de suivi des engagements

 

Sans limiter les conditions 2, 3 et 4, Trans Mountain doit mettre en œuvre les engagements contenus dans le tableau de suivi de ses engagements. Le promoteur mettra à jour périodiquement le tableau de suivi des engagements comme indiqué en b), en ajoutant au tableau tous les engagements pris par le promoteur à l'égard du projet après la clôture de l'instance MH-052-2018, et doit:

 

a)  déposer auprès de l’Office, et publier sur son site Web, au moins (30) jours avant le début de la construction, le tableau de suivi des engagements. Le tableau de suivi des engagements doit contenir :

 

i)  tous les engagements pris par Trans Mountain envers les groupes autochtones dans le cadre de sa demande de projet ou qu’elle s’est engagée à respecter dans le cadre de la procédure OH-001-2014 et de la procédure MH-052-2018, au cours des consultations de la phase III et IV et durant les consultations et engagements continus,

ii)  un plan pour donner suite à tous les engagements pris envers les groupes autochtones, ce plan doit inclure :

 

1)  une description de l’approche pour donner suite à chacun des engagements pris envers les groupes autochtones,

 

2)  le responsable de la mise en œuvre de chaque engagement,

 

3)  le calendrier prévu pour l’exécution de chaque engagement,

 

4)  les critères utilisés pour déterminer le moment où les engagements ont été remplis/satisfaits.

 

b)  déposer auprès de l’Office, dans les délais indiqués ci-après, un tableau de suivi des engagements à jour, y compris le statut de chaque engagement :


 

i)  dans les trois mois suivant la date [du certificat/de l’ordonnance];

 

ii)  au moins 30 jours avant le début de la construction;

 

iii)  une fois par mois à compter du début de la construction jusqu’au premier mois suivant l’entrée en exploitation;

 

iv)  une fois par trimestre par la suite jusqu’à ce que :

 

1)  tous les engagements prévus soient respectés (remplacés, complétés ou autrement clos), et Trans Mountain doit alors déposer avis signé par un dirigeant de la société confirmant que les engagements prévus ont été tenus; ou

 

2)  six ans se soient écoulés après la mise en service, moment auquel Trans Mountain doit présenter à l’Office un résumé de tout engagement non tenu et un plan et un calendrier d’exécution pour le faire; selon l’éventualité la plus rapprochée;

 

c)  Publier sur son site Web les informations décrites aux points a) et b), dans les mêmes délais,

 

d)  maintenir à chacun de ses bureaux de construction :

 

i.  les volets pertinents du tableau de suivi des engagements liés à l’environnement, qui énumère tous les engagements pris par Trans Mountain en vertu de règlements, notamment ceux énoncés dans la demande et les dépôts ultérieurs, et les conditions environnementales ou les mesures d’atténuation ou de surveillance propres aux sites tirées des permis, autorisations ou approbations délivrés par les autorités fédérales, provinciales ou autres dans le cadre du projet;

 

ii.  des copies des permis, autorisations ou approbations mentionnés en i);

 

iii.  des copies des modifications apportées ultérieurement aux permis, autorisations ou approbations visées au point i), le cas échéant.

 


 

Condition 91: Plan de prévention des déversements en milieu marin et engagements d’intervention

 

Trans Mountain doit déposer auprès de l’Office, dans les 6 mois suivant la délivrance du certificat, un plan décrivant comment elle assurera le respect des exigences énoncées dans la condition 133 relatives à la prévention des déversements en milieu marin et à l’intervention. Le plan doit être établi en consultation avec Transports Canada, la Garde côtière canadienne, l’Administration de pilotage du Pacifique, l’Administration portuaire de Vancouver-Fraser, les Pilotes côtiers de la Colombie-Britannique, la Société d’intervention maritime de l’Ouest du Canada, Pêches et Océans Canada, et la province de la Colombie-Britannique et les groupes autochtones susceptibles d’être touchés, et doit indiquer le sujet des questions ou des enjeux soulevés et comment Trans Mountain y a donné suite.

 

Trans Mountain doit fournir un résumé de ses consultations à cette fin, y compris une description et une justification de la manière dont Trans Mountain a intégré les résultats de sa consultation dans sa stratégie.

 

Trans Mountain doit fournir le plan aux parties susmentionnées en même temps qu’il sera déposé auprès de l’ONÉ. 

 

Condition 98: Plan de participation des groupes autochtones à la surveillance de la construction

 

Trans Mountain doit déposer auprès de l’Office, au moins 2 mois avant le début de la construction, un plan décrivant la participation des groupes autochtones aux activités de surveillance durant la construction qui vise à protéger l’usage des terres et des ressources à des fins traditionnelles dans le cas des canalisations et des installations et l’utilisation des ressources marines à des fins traditionnelles au terminal maritime Westridge. Ce plan doit comprendre ce qui suit :

 

a)  un résumé des activités de participation entreprises avec les groupes autochtones pour déterminer les possibilités qu’ils participent aux activités de surveillance;

 

b)  une description et une justification de la façon dont Trans Mountain a incorporé au plan les résultats de ses engagements, y compris toutes les recommandations;

 

c)  une liste des groupes autochtones éventuellement touchés, s’il en est, qui se sont entendus avec Trans Mountain pour participer à la surveillance;

 


 

d)  la portée, les méthodes et la justification des activités de surveillance qui seront menées par Trans Mountain et chaque groupe autochtone participant mentionné en b), y compris les éléments de construction et les emplacements auxquels seront associés les surveillants autochtones;

 

e)  une description de la façon dont Trans Mountain utilisera l’information réunie par les surveillants autochtones;

 

f)  une description de la façon dont Trans Mountain fournira aux groupes autochtones susceptibles d’être touchés, sous réserve de la protection appropriée des informations confidentielles, l’information réunie par les surveillants autochtones.

 

Trans Mountain doit fournir une copie du rapport à chacun des tous les groupes susceptibles d’être touchés identifiés en b) ci-dessus en même temps qu’elle le dépose auprès de l’ONÉ.

 

Condition 100: ressources patrimoniales et sites sacrés et culturels

 

Trans Mountain doit déposer auprès de l’Office, au moins trente (30) jours avant le début de la construction de chaque composante du pipeline décrit dans la condition 10a) :

 

a)  une confirmation, signée par un dirigeant de la société, attestant qu’elle a obtenu, à l’égard des ressources archéologiques et patrimoniales, tous les permis et les autorisations nécessaires du ministère de la Culture de l’Alberta et du ministère des Forêts, des Terres et de l’Exploitation des ressources naturelles de la Colombie-Britannique;

 

b)  une confirmation indiquant qu’elle a consulté le ministère des Forêts, des Terres et de l’Exploitation des ressources naturelles de la Colombie-Britannique et que le ministère a examiné et approuvé les mesures d’atténuation de la perturbation des sites paléontologiques touchés en Colombie-Britannique;

 

c)  une description de la manière dont Trans Mountain entend respecter toutes les conditions et donner suite aux commentaires et aux recommandations dont il est fait état dans les permis et les autorisations visées au point a) ou obtenues dans le cas de la consultation mentionnée en b);

 

d)  une liste des sites sacrés et culturels identifiés dans l'instance OH-001-2014, la procédure de réexamen MH-05-2018, ou les consultations de la Couronne de la phase III et pas encore incluses en vertu de la condition 97;


 

e)  une description de toute mesure d'atténuation proposée que Trans Mountain mettra en œuvre pour réduire ou éliminer, dans la mesure du possible, les effets du projet sur les sites énumérés en d), ou une raison pour laquelle l'atténuation n’a pas été nécessaire; et,

 

f)  la confirmation que Trans Mountain mettra à jour le plan (ou les plans) de protection de l'environnement concerné, comme l'exige la condition 96, pour inclure toute information pertinente issue des conditions ou recommandations mentionnées en c) ou des mesures d'atténuation mentionnées en e).

 

Condition 124: Mise en œuvre des améliorations au programme de gestion des urgences de Trans Mountain

 

Trans Mountain doit soumettre à l’Office, au moins 6 mois avant le début de l’exploitation, un résumé détaillé de l’examen de ses plans et de son équipement d’intervention en cas d’urgence (conformément aux conditions 125 et 126) et son équipement (y compris sa disponibilité), conformément au volume 7, section 4.8.2 de sa demande de projet (dépôt A3S4V5). Ce document doit contenir une description des modifications apportées au programme de gestion des situations d’urgence de la société, comme l’exige le Règlement de l’Office national de l’énergie sur les pipelines terrestres, à la suite de l’examen, notamment :

 

a)  les modifications du plan d’intervention en cas d’urgence sur l’oléoduc;

 

b)  les plans d’intervention d’urgence pour les terminaux d’Edmonton, de Sumas et de Burnaby, ainsi que le terminal maritime Westridge;

 

c)  les plans et documents connexes propres au site, comme les plans liés à a) et b), le plan d’intervention géographique, les stratégies d’intervention géographique, les cartes des postes de commandement, les plans tactiques visant le pétrole submergé et immergé et les plans tactiques pour les zones sujettes à de graves conséquences.

 

Le résumé doit démontrer la capacité de la société de se préparer à des situations d’urgence de tous genres, survenant en toute saison ou dans n’importe quelle région géographique, à effectuer une intervention, à assurer la reprise des activités et à atténuer les effets éventuels de la situation d’urgence.

 

i)  Il doit contenir les éléments suivants : une analyse de la conformité des plans mis à jour aux exigences du Règlement de l’Office national de l’énergie sur les pipelines terrestres;


 

ii)  une analyse de la façon dont les plans tiennent compte des interventions d’urgence du fédéral, des provinces, des municipalités et des collectivités autochtones, et permettent la coordination avec eux;

 

iii)  une analyse de la façon dont les résultats de projets de recherche, comme les travaux du comité consultatif scientifique mentionnés dans la réponse de Trans Mountain à la DR 1.63 (dépôt A3W9H8) et les autres travaux de recherche mentionnés au cours de l’instance OH-001-2014, ont été pris en considération et intégrés dans le processus de planification des interventions d’urgence de Trans Mountain;

iv)  une description des modèles utilisés pour la planification d’interventions, y compris des modèles de la trajectoire, des conditions futures, du comportement des hydrocarbures et de dispersion dans l’atmosphère;

 

v)  une confirmation indiquant qu’un tiers indépendant a examiné et évalué le plan de préparation et d’intervention d’urgence et que Trans Mountain a pris en considération et intégré dans le plan les commentaires découlant de cet examen.

 

vi)  un résumé de ses consultations avec les autorités gouvernementales compétentes, les premiers intervenants, les groupes autochtones potentiellement affectés et les propriétaires / locataires affectés (conditions 90 et 117). Dans son résumé, Trans Mountain doit fournir une description et une justification de la manière dont Trans Mountain a incorporé les résultats de sa consultation, y compris les recommandations des personnes consultées dans le programme de gestion des urgences de Trans Mountain, y compris ses plans d’intervention d’urgence.

 

Condition 151: Rapports de surveillance environnementale après la construction

 

Trans Mountain doit déposer auprès de l’Office, au plus tard le 31 janvier suivant les première, troisième et cinquième saisons de croissance complètes après le nettoyage final, un rapport de surveillance environnementale après construction qui doit contenir les éléments d’information suivants :

 

a)  une description des éléments ou enjeux centraux qui ont fait l’objet d’une évaluation ou d’une surveillance;

 

b)  une définition des objectifs mesurables pour chaque élément ou enjeu central;

 

c)  un examen des méthodes de surveillance pour chaque élément ou enjeu central et des résultats de la surveillance ainsi qu’une comparaison de ces résultats avec les objectifs mesurables définis;

d)  une description des mesures correctives prises, de leur rendement observé et de leur état actuel;

 

e)  l’indication sur une carte ou un diagramme des lieux où des mesures correctives ont été prises;

 

f)  la description des autres mesures correctives prévues et un calendrier de surveillance et d’établissement de rapport; et

 

g)  un résumé des consultations qu’elle a menées auprès des autorités gouvernementales compétentes, des groupes autochtones susceptibles d’être touchés et des propriétaires fonciers/locataires touchés. Dans le rapport de surveillance environnementale soumis après la cinquième saison de croissance complète suivant le nettoyage.

 

h)  dans son résumé, Trans Mountain doit fournir une description et une justification sur la façon dont elle a intégré les résultats de ses consultations dans la stratégie.

 

Dans le rapport de surveillance environnementale post-construction déposé après la cinquième saison de croissance complète après le nettoyage, Trans Mountain doit inclure:

 

i)  une évaluation de l’efficacité des mesures d’atténuation et des mesures correctives ainsi qu’un examen de la façon dont les apprentissages ont été ou seront utilisés dans le programme de protection de l’environnement de Trans Mountain;

 

ii)  une description détaillée de tous les éléments ou enjeux centraux dont les objectifs mesurables n’ont pas été atteints pendant la durée du programme de surveillance du projet après construction;

 

iii)  une évaluation de la nécessité d’autres mesures correctives, et d’objectifs mesurables, de la surveillance des éléments ou enjeux centraux, y compris un calendrier pour ces activités.

 

Tous les rapports de surveillance environnementale après construction déposés doivent porter sur des questions qui se rattachent aux sujets suivants, mais sans s’y limiter : sols; mauvaises herbes; ouvrages de franchissement de cours d’eau; végétation riveraine; terres humides; plantes rares, lichens et communautés écologiques; remplacement d’arbres municipaux; faune et habitat faunique, poissons de mer et leur habitat; poisson de mer et habitat du poisson; mammifères marins; oiseaux de mer et espèces en péril.


 

ORDER AO-004-OC-49

 

 

IN THE MATTER OF the National Energy Board Act (NEB Act) and the regulations made thereunder; and

 

IN THE MATTER OF the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, (CEA Act) and the regulations made thereunder; and

 

IN THE MATTER OF an application pursuant to sections 52, 58 and 21 of the NEB Act and section 44 of the National Energy Board Onshore Pipeline Regulations (OPR), dated 16 December 2013, by Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC (Trans Mountain) to construct and operate the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (Project) between Edmonton, Alberta, and Burnaby, British Columbia, filed with the National Energy Board (NEB or Board) under File OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 02; and

 

IN THE MATTER OF Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177, referring aspects of the Board’s recommendation back for reconsideration, filed with the Board under File OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 59.

 

BEFORE the Board on XX Month 2019.

 

WHEREAS the issuance of Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) OC-49 to Terasen Pipelines [Trans Mountain] Inc. authorizing the construction and operation of a pipeline loop and associated facilities extending from Hinton, Alberta to Hargreaves, a location near Rearguard, British Columbia (TMX-Anchor Loop) was approved by Governor in Council, through Order in Council No. P.C. 2006-1410, on 23 November 2006;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2007-1181, dated 31 July 2007, approved Order AO-001-OC-49 which changed the name of the holder of CPCN OC-49 to Trans Mountain;

 


 

AND WHEREAS the application included a request for authorization to:

·  deactivate Wolf Pump Station; and

·  remove from CPCN OC-49 the 150 km NPS 36 pipeline segment between Hinton, Alberta and Hargreaves, a location near Rearguard, British Columbia (transferring from the TMX-Anchor Loop to Line 2);

(collectively, Anchor Loop Work)

 

AND WHEREAS the Board held a public hearing in respect of the Project pursuant to Hearing Order OH-001-2014;

 

AND WHEREAS the Board had regard to all considerations that were directly related to the Project and were relevant, including environmental matters, pursuant to Part III of the NEB Act, and conducted an environmental assessment of the Project pursuant to the CEA Act;

 

AND WHEREAS the Board provided the Governor in Council with its recommendations and decisions on the application for the Project, and reasons, which were set out in the OH-001-2014 National Energy Board Report for the Project dated 19 May 2016 (the 2016 Report);

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2016-1069 dated 29 November 2016, approved, among other things, the issuance of Amending Order AO-002-OC-49, which authorized the Anchor Loop Work;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2018-0058, dated 2 February 2018, approved Order AO-003-OC-49 which further amended OC-49 to remove the Wolf Pump Station from Schedule A, reflecting that the Wolf Pump Station will remain in operational service (the Amendment to the Anchor Loop Work);

 

AND WHEREAS on 30 August 2018, the Federal Court of Appeal set aside Order in Council No. P.C. 2016-1069 and remitted the application to the Governor in Council for redetermination;

 

AND WHEREAS by Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177 dated 20 September 2018, the Governor in Council referred the recommendations and all terms or conditions relevant to Project-related marine shipping set out in the 2016 Report back to the Board for reconsideration (Reconsideration);

 

AND WHEREAS the Board held a public hearing in respect of the Reconsideration pursuant to Hearing Order MH-052-2018;

 

AND WHEREAS, as directed by Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177, the Board conducted an environmental assessment of Project-related marine shipping pursuant to the CEA Act and considered the evidence relating to potential impacts of Project-related marine shipping on Indigenous peoples;

 

AND WHEREAS the Board’s recommendations and decisions on the application for the Project and the Reconsideration, and reasons, are set out in the MH-052-2018 National Energy Board Reconsideration Report (Reconsideration Report);

 

AND WHEREAS the Board submitted its Reconsideration Report to the Minister recommending changes to the conditions for the Project; that a Certificate be issued and two existing Certificates be amended for the Project pursuant to subsections 53(5) and 21(2) of the NEB Act;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2019-XXXX dated the XX Month 2019, has approved AO-002-OC-49 issued on December 1, 2016 and approved the issuance of this Amending Order to CPCN OC-49;

 

IT IS ORDERED that pursuant to subsection 21(2) of the NEB Act, CPCN OC-49 is hereby varied to approve the Anchor Loop Work and the Amendment to the Anchor Loop Work, subject to the conditions marked as applicable in the “OC49” column set out in set out in Appendix 3 of the MH-052-2018 National Energy Board Reconsideration Report, and with the applicable conditions as amended by the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2019.

 

Issued at Calgary, Alberta on XX Month 2019.

 

 

NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD

 

 

 

 

 

Sheri Young

Secretary of the Board


 

ORDONNANCE AO-004-OC-49

 

 

RELATIVEMENT À la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie (la « Loi ») et à ses règlements d’application;

 

RELATIVEMENT À la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012) (la « LCEE (2012) ») et à ses règlements d’application;

 

RELATIVEMENT À une demande datée du 16 décembre 2013 que Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC (« Trans Mountain ») a présentée à l’Office national de l’énergie aux termes des articles 52, 58 et 21 de la Loi et de l’article 44 du Règlement de l’Office national de l’énergie sur les pipelines terrestres, afin d’être autorisée à construire et à exploiter le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain (le « projet ») entre Edmonton, en Alberta, et Burnaby, en Colombie-Britannique (dossier OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 02);

 

RELATIVEMENT AU décret C.P. 2018-1177 ayant pour effet de renvoyer à l’Office, pour réexamen, certains aspects du rapport de recommandation de mai 2016 (dossier OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 59).

 

DEVANT l’Office, le XX mois 2019.

 

ATTENDU QUE la délivrance du certificat d’utilité publique OC-49 à Terasen Pipelines [Trans Mountain] Inc. autorisant la construction et l’exploitation d’un doublement de pipeline s’étendant de Hinton, en Alberta, jusqu’à Hargreaves, près de Rearguard, en Colombie-Britannique, ainsi que les installations connexes (le « doublement d’ancrage TMX »), par voie du décret C.P. 2006-1410 daté du 23 novembre 2006;

 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2007-1181 daté du 31 juillet 2007, a approuvé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-001-OC-49 ayant pour effet de remplacer la dénomination sociale du titulaire du certificat par celle de Trans Mountain;

 


 

ATTENDU QUE la demande concerne notamment l’obtention des autorisations nécessaires aux fins suivantes :

·  la désactivation de la station de pompage Wolf;

·  la suppression, du certificat OC-49, du tronçon d’un diamètre nominal NPS 24 (610 mm) de 150 km de long s’étendant de Hinton, en Alberta, jusqu’à Hargreaves, près de Rearguard, en Colombie-Britannique, le faisant passer du doublement d’ancrage TMX à la canalisation 2;

(collectivement, les « ouvrages de doublement d’ancrage »)

 

ATTENDU QUE, conformément à l’ordonnance d’audience OH-001-2014, l’Office a tenu une audience publique concernant le projet;

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a examiné tous les aspects pertinents qui se rapportent directement au projet, dont les questions environnementales, aux termes de la partie III de la Loi, et a réalisé une évaluation environnementale du projet selon les dispositions de la LCEE (2012);

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a transmis au gouverneur en conseil le rapport OH-001-2014 daté du 19 mai 2016 (le « rapport de 2016 ») renfermant ses recommandations et décisions relativement à la demande présentée en vue du projet, ainsi que les motifs à l’appui;

 

ATTENDU QUE le gouverneur en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2016-1069 daté du 29 novembre 2016, a notamment agréé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-002-OC-49 ayant pour effet d’autoriser les ouvrages de doublement d’ancrage;

 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2018-0058 daté du 2 février 2018, a agréé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-003-OC-49 ayant pour effet de modifier encore une fois le certificat, de manière à en supprimer de l’annexe A la station de pompage Wolf, qui demeurera en état de fonctionnement (la « modification aux ouvrages de doublement d’ancrage »);

 

ATTENDU QUE, le 30 août 2018, la Cour d’appel fédérale a annulé le décret C.P. 2016-1069 et a renvoyé l’approbation du projet à la gouverneure en conseil pour qu’elle prenne une nouvelle décision;

 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2018-1177 daté du 20 septembre 2018, a renvoyé à l’Office, pour réexamen, les recommandations et les conditions contenues dans le rapport de 2016 ayant trait au transport maritime connexe au projet (le « réexamen »);

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a tenu une audience publique de réexamen conformément à l’ordonnance d’audience MH-052-2018;

 

ATTENDU QUE, sur instruction de la gouverneure en conseil, donnée au moyen du décret C.P. 2018-1177, l’Office a effectué une évaluation environnementale du transport maritime connexe au projet, conformément aux dispositions de la LCEE (2012), et a étudié la preuve relative aux effets éventuels du transport maritime connexe au projet sur les peuples autochtones;

 

ATTENDU QUE les recommandations et les décisions de l’Office concernant la demande, et les motifs s’y rapportant, sont énoncés dans le rapport de réexamen MH-052-2018 (le « rapport de réexamen »);

 

ATTENDU QUE dans le rapport de réexamen déposé devant le Ministre, l’Office recommande la modification de certaines conditions visant le projet, la délivrance d’un nouveau certificat ainsi que la modification de deux certificats relativement au projet, conformément aux paragraphes 53(5) et 21(2) de la Loi;

 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2019-XXXX daté du XX mois 2019, agrée la délivrance de l’ordonnance modificatrice AO-002-OC-49 délivrée le 1 décembre 2016 et la délivrance de la présente ordonnance modificatrice, qui est connexe au certificat OC-49;

 

IL EST ORDONNÉ QUE le certificat soit modifié, en vertu du paragraphe 21(2) de la Loi, de manière à autoriser les ouvrages de doublement d’ancrage et la modification aux ouvrages de doublement d’ancrage, sous réserve des conditions applicables de la colonne « OC49 » de l’annexe 3 du rapport de réexamen MH-052-2018 de l’Office, ainsi que les conditions applicables remplacées par la gouverneure en conseil au moyen du décret C.P. 2019-XXXX.

 

Rendue à Calgary, en Alberta, le XX mois 2019.

 

 

OFFICE NATIONAL DE L’ÉNERGIE

 

La secrétaire de l’Office,

 

 

 

 

Sheri Young


 

ORDER AO-005-OC-2

 

 

IN THE MATTER OF the National Energy Board Act (NEB Act) and the regulations made thereunder; and

 

IN THE MATTER OF the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, (CEA Act) and the regulations made thereunder; and

 

IN THE MATTER OF an application pursuant to sections 52, 58 and 21 of the NEB Act and section 44 of the National Energy Board Onshore Pipeline Regulations (OPR), dated 16 December 2013, by Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC (Trans Mountain) to construct and operate the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (Project) between Edmonton, Alberta, and Burnaby, British Columbia, filed with the National Energy Board (NEB or Board) under

File OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 02; and

 

IN THE MATTER OF Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177, referring aspects of the Board’s recommendation back for reconsideration, filed with the Board under File OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 59.

 

BEFORE the Board on XX Month 2019.

 

WHEREAS the Board issued Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) OC-2 to Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company authorizing the construction and operation of an oil pipeline from Edmonton, Alberta to Burnaby, British Columbia, and CPCN OC-2 came into force on 19 August 1960;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 1964-1725 dated 5 November 1964, approved Order AO-001-OC-2, reflecting minor wording changes to CPCN OC-2 related to route maps, design drawings and specifications of pipe and facilities;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2007-1181 dated 31 July 2007, approved Order AO-002-OC-2, which changed the name of the holder of CPCN OC-2 to Trans Mountain;

 

AND WHEREAS the application included a request for authorization to:

·  decommission one tank at the Edmonton Terminal West Tank Area and one tank at the Burnaby Terminal;

·  reactivate a 150 km NPS 24 pipeline segment between Hinton, Alberta and Hargreaves (a location near Rearguard, British Columbia), a 43 km NPS 24 pipeline segment from Darfield to Black Pines, and the Niton Pump Station, all of which were authorized under CPCN OC-2; and

·  remove from CPCN OC-2 the 43 km NPS 30 pipeline segment between Darfield and Black Pines (transferring from the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline system to Line 2)

(collectively Line 1 Work).

 

AND WHEREAS the Board held a public hearing in respect of the Project pursuant to Hearing Order OH-001-2014;

 

AND WHEREAS the Board had regard to all considerations that were directly related to the Project and were relevant, including environmental matters, pursuant to Part III of the NEB Act, and conducted an environmental assessment of the Project pursuant to the CEA Act;

 

AND WHEREAS the Board provided the Governor in Council with its recommendations and decisions on the application for the Project, and reasons, which were set out in the OH-001-2014 National Energy Board Report for the Project dated 19 May 2016 (the 2016 Report);

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2016-1069 dated 29 November 2016, approved, among other things, the issuance of Amending Order AO-003-OC-2, which authorized the Line 1 Work;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2018-0058, dated 2 February 2018, approved Order AO-004-OC-2 which further amended OC-2 to remove the Niton Pump Station and Tank No. 9 of the Edmonton Terminal West Tank Area from Schedule A, reflecting that the Niton Pump Station will remain in a deactivated state and that Tank No. 9 of the Edmonton Terminal West Tank Area will remain in operational service (collectively, the Amendments to the Line 1 Work);

 

AND WHEREAS on 30 August 2018, the Federal Court of Appeal set aside Order in Council No. P.C. 2016-1069 and remitted the application to the Governor in Council for redetermination;

 


 

AND WHEREAS by Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177 dated 20 September 2018, the Governor in Council referred the recommendations and all terms or conditions relevant to Project-related marine shipping set out in the 2016 Report back to the Board for reconsideration (Reconsideration);

 

AND WHEREAS the Board held a public hearing in respect of the Reconsideration pursuant to Hearing Order MH-052-2018;

 

AND WHEREAS, as directed by Order in Council P.C. 2018-1177, the Board conducted an environmental assessment of Project-related marine shipping pursuant to the CEA Act and considered the evidence relating to potential impacts of Project-related marine shipping on Indigenous peoples;

 

AND WHEREAS the Board’s recommendations and decisions on the application for the Project and the Reconsideration, and reasons, are set out in the MH-052-2018 National Energy Board Reconsideration Report (Reconsideration Report);

 

AND WHEREAS the Board submitted its Reconsideration Report to the Minister recommending changes to the conditions for the Project; that a Certificate be issued and two existing Certificates be amended for the Project pursuant to subsections 53(5) and 21(2) of the NEB Act;

 

AND WHEREAS the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2019-XXXX dated the XX Month 2019, has approved AO-003-OC-2 issued on December 1, 2016 and approved the issuance of this Amending Order to CPCN OC-2;

 

IT IS ORDERED that pursuant to subsection 21(2) of the NEB Act, CPCN OC-2 is hereby varied to approve the Line 1 Work and the Amendments to the Line 1 Work, subject to the conditions marked as applicable in the “OC2” column set out in Appendix 3 of the MH-052-2018 National Energy Board Reconsideration Report, and with the applicable conditions as amended by the Governor in Council, by Order in Council No. P.C. 2019-XXXX.

 

Issued at Calgary, Alberta on XX Month 2019.

 

NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD

 

 

Sheri Young

Secretary of the Board


 

ORDONNANCE AO-005-OC-2

 

 

RELATIVEMENT À la Loi sur l’Office national de l’énergie (la « Loi ») et à ses règlements d’application;

 

RELATIVEMENT À la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale (2012) (la « LCEE (2012) ») et à ses règlements d’application;

 

RELATIVEMENT À une demande datée du 16 décembre 2013 que Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC (« Trans Mountain ») a présentée à l’Office national de l’énergie aux termes des articles 52, 58 et 21 de la Loi et de l’article 44 du Règlement de l’Office national de l’énergie sur les pipelines terrestres, afin d’être autorisée à construire et à exploiter le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain (le « projet ») entre Edmonton, en Alberta, et Burnaby, en Colombie-Britannique (dossier OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 02);

 

RELATIVEMENT AU décret C.P. 2018-1177 ayant pour effet de renvoyer à l’Office, pour réexamen, certains aspects du rapport de recommandation de mai 2016 (dossier OF-Fac-T260-2013-03 59).

 

DEVANT l’Office, le XX mois 2019.

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a délivré le certificat d’utilité publique OC-2 (le « certificat »), qui est entré en vigueur le 19 août 1960, à l’endroit de Trans Mountain Oil Pipeline Company, ce qui a eu pour effet d’autoriser la société à construire et à exploiter un oléoduc s’étendant d’Edmonton, en Alberta, à Burnaby, en Colombie-Britannique;

 

ATTENDU QUE le gouverneur en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 1964-1725 daté du 5 novembre 1964, a approuvé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-001-OC-2, afin de rendre compte d’une légère modification du certificat, d’ordre rédactionnel, ayant trait aux cartes du tracé, aux dessins de conception et aux caractéristiques techniques de la canalisation et des installations;

 


 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2007-1181 daté du 31 juillet 2007, a approuvé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-002-OC-2 ayant pour effet de remplacer la dénomination sociale du titulaire du certificat par celle de Trans Mountain;

 

ATTENDU QUE la demande concerne notamment l’obtention des autorisations nécessaires aux fins suivantes :

·  la désaffectation d’un réservoir de la zone de stockage de l’ouest au terminal Edmonton et d’un réservoir au terminal Burnaby,

·  la réactivation d’un tronçon d’un diamètre nominal NPS 24 (610 mm) de 150 km de long entre Hinton, en Alberta, et Hargreaves (localité à proximité de Rearguard), en Colombie-Britannique, d’un tronçon NPS 24 de 43 km de long entre Darfield et Black Pines, en Colombie-Britannique, et de la station de pompage Niton, réactivation autorisée par le certificat;

·  la suppression, du certificat, du tronçon d’un diamètre nominal NPS 30 (762 mm) de 43 km de long reliant Darfield à Black Pines, afin de faire état du transfert du tronçon, qui fait partie du réseau actuel de Trans Mountain, à la canalisation 2

(collectivement, les « travaux relatifs à la canalisation 1 »);

 

ATTENDU QUE, conformément à l’ordonnance d’audience OH-001-2014, l’Office a tenu une audience publique concernant le projet;

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a examiné tous les aspects pertinents qui se rapportent directement au projet, dont les questions environnementales, aux termes de la partie III de la Loi, et a réalisé une évaluation environnementale du projet selon les dispositions de la LCEE (2012);

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a transmis au gouverneur en conseil le rapport OH-001-2014 daté du 19 mai 2016 (le « rapport de 2016 ») renfermant ses recommandations et décisions relativement à la demande présentée en vue du projet, ainsi que les motifs à l’appui;

 

ATTENDU QUE le gouverneur en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2016-1069 daté du 29 novembre 2016, a notamment agréé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-003-OC-2 ayant pour effet d’autoriser les travaux relatifs à la canalisation 1;

 


 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2018-0058 daté du 2 février 2018 a agréé la délivrance de l’ordonnance AO-004-OC-2 ayant pour effet de modifier encore une fois le certificat, de manière à en supprimer, de l’annexe A, la station de pompage Niton et le réservoir no 9 se trouvant dans la zone de stockage de l’ouest au terminal Edmonton ainsi qu’à tenir compte du maintien de la station de pompage Niton en mode de désactivation et du maintien du réservoir no 9 en état de fonctionnement (la « modification des travaux relatifs à la canalisation 1 »);

 

ATTENDU QUE, le 30 août 2018, la Cour d’appel fédérale a annulé le décret C.P. 2016-1069 et a renvoyé l’approbation du projet à la gouverneure en conseil pour qu’elle prenne une nouvelle décision;

 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2018-1177 daté du 20 septembre 2018, a renvoyé à l’Office, pour réexamen, les recommandations et les conditions contenues dans le rapport de 2016 ayant trait au transport maritime connexe au projet (le « réexamen »);

 

ATTENDU QUE l’Office a tenu une audience publique de réexamen conformément à l’ordonnance d’audience MH-052-2018;

 

ATTENDU QUE, sur instruction de la gouverneure en conseil, donnée au moyen du décret C.P. 2018-1177, l’Office a effectué une évaluation environnementale du transport maritime connexe au projet, conformément aux dispositions de la LCEE (2012), et a étudié la preuve relative aux effets éventuels du transport maritime connexe au projet sur les peuples autochtones;

 

ATTENDU QUE les recommandations et les décisions de l’Office concernant la demande, et les motifs s’y rapportant, sont énoncés dans le rapport de réexamen MH-052-2018 (le « rapport de réexamen »);

 

ATTENDU QUE dans le rapport de réexamen déposé devant le Ministre, l’Office recommande la modification de certaines conditions visant le projet, la délivrance d’un nouveau certificat ainsi que la modification de deux certificats relativement au projet, conformément aux paragraphes 53(5) et 21(2) de la Loi;

 

ATTENDU QUE la gouverneure en conseil, au moyen du décret C.P. 2019-XXXX daté du XX mois 2019, agrée la délivrance de l’ordonnance modificatrice AO-003-OC-2 délivrée le 1 décembre 2016 et agrée la délivrance de la présente ordonnance modificatrice visant le certificat OC-2;

 


 

IL EST ORDONNÉ QUE le certificat soit modifié, en vertu du paragraphe 21(2) de la Loi, de manière à autoriser les travaux relatifs à la canalisation 1 et la modification des travaux relatifs à la canalisation 1, sous réserve des conditions applicables de la colonne « OC2 » de l’annexe 3 du rapport de réexamen MH-052-2018 de l’Office, ainsi que les conditions applicables remplacées par la gouverneure en conseil au moyen du décret C.P. 2019-XXX .

 

Rendue à Calgary, en Alberta, le XX mois 2019.

 

 

OFFICE NATIONAL DE L’ÉNERGIE

 

La secrétaire de l’Office,

 

 

 

 

Sheri Young